Swim gala, building, visitors, a breakdown and covid-19

Tobias’ parents and brother arrived to spend 2 weeks with us before heading back home with their eldest son. We managed to squeeze in a bush trip while they were here, heading to our beloved Mababe. They spent the rest of their holiday lazying around at our home and catching some vitamin D.

Just a week after they had left we welcomed Oma (grandma) Kristin from Norway into our home. Her plan was to spend 3 weeks in Botswana traveling with a close friend. But her friend had to abandon the trip due to health issues. This meant that grandma had the choice of joining us to Gaborone the day after her arrival or to stay behind by herself. As we were taking our kids down for the North vs South schools swim gala, which both our boys managed to qualify for. She obviously joined in on a day spent in the car to make the 1000 km journey to the capital. Just 200 km short of ending the long day our car suddenly overheated and I managed to let it roll into the shade of a tree. Opening the bonnet I discovered that the pipe from the engine to the radiator had burst…

Within a few minutes I had the pipe removed and asked a friendly passer by to help me find a new pipe in the nearest town 20 km away. The only thing left to do now was wait…

Two hours later they had returned and the pipe was in place. The radiator filled up with the last of our drinking water and we were ready to roll, arriving late that evening. The following day I took the boys to meet up with the northern team for a team practice and to get their gear. All in orange they were ready for the races.

The first races were to start off in the afternoon and both the boys and us parents were excited. The southern team had created a fantastic atmosphere, complemented by the northern supporters in orange! The stands were filled with cheering parents, family and friends.

Two days of exciting races came to an end and the boys were happy to score some medals. Robin earning 2 and Nicolas 4.

Now we just had to wait for our car to be cleared. I had taken it to a mechanic to make sure the cylinder head was alright. Unfortunately for Oma Kristin the corona virus was in full swing in the rest of the world and she decided to take the next possible flight home, after she had conferred with her doctor son and daughter. She had spent a total of 3 nights in Botswana! After having gotten off the plane she spent the next day sitting 10 hours in a car, see her grandchildren swim and then fly back home again… at least we got to see her! Looking forward to a longer visit next time.

We eventually made our way home safe and sound without car troubles. Although covid-19 was a reality in most parts of the world, Botswana only confirmed its first cases yesterday. The government did close schools a few weeks ago and encouraged social distancing early to minimize any potential spread. How realistic the numbers are is difficult to say, as testing is limited. And flights in and out of the country were ongoing until a few days ago. We have had the kids home and I have stopped treating patients. We have so far enjoyed the days together doing schoolwork and reading with the kids. But also training together and engaging the kids in other activities such as baking, gardening, fixing and cooking. Learning something really useful for their later life.

Because of the travel restrictions all the tourists have cancelled their holidays to Botswana. Meaning that one of the country’s biggest industries has stalled. And with that many have lost their job… when we moved into our own space we decided to employ two women to help with the household and to support them and their families in exchange for their service. Even though the government will go into a total lock down in 2 days we will try and continue to support these two ladies and hope that things pass quickly. The lock down will also mean that the building process will have to come to a halt. Luckily we have managed to do quite a bit in the last few weeks and we are now done with the walls to window level.

The site finally resembles a house and the next step is the ring beam. When this will continue we’ll have to wait and see. But for the foreseeable future we will not be moving into that house yet. Luckily the landlord of our current space is very helpful and has dropped the rent considerably.

We hope you all stay safe and make the best of the isolation that awaits us.

Break down in the bush

The months fly by, visitors have come and gone, and while we were waiting for the next batch of foreigners to arrive we decided to take a little family trip to the bush on our own. The car was packed and ready to roll when we pulled into the school parking lot to pick up the kids. A little lunch pack for the road in hand we were ready to roll towards Khwai. Cruising and joking around, the landscape was flying by, spotting the odd antelope and Elefant along the way. Just 10 km out of Mababe village in the middle of the bush the car suddenly made a horrible grinding noise!! Shifting the leaver into neutral we let it roll to a halt. Unsure what it could be I tried to engage the gear but the grinding continued and there was no traction. Our car did not move. After examining the car I found the front drive shaft had slipped out of the wheel hub… mentally preparing to overnight by the side of the road and somehow getting towed back to town, I started loosening the bolts of the wheel. Not sure how to fix this the safari seemed over before it had started. Shortly after our stop a safari vehicle came driving along the road. The friendly driver called Andy was a qualified mechanic back in the day and had now started his own safari business. Ironic that Handy Andy suddenly appeared and could help us out. Together we managed to get the drive shaft back into the wheel hub only to find out that the gap for the snap ring had totally worn off…

So I took a bolt off the roof rack and undid the suspension to remove one of the washers, using these parts to secure the axle in place.

Our safari could continue a few hours later. The sun now having set a long time ago, we drove through the dark enjoying a little night safari, spotting 3 hyenas on the road just a few kilometers from the campsite. Setting up the tent in the dark was adventurous and the kids helped, shining the torch, making a fire and getting some food ready. We all crawled into the sleeping bags together once we had gotten some food in our bellies.

Back in town our car was parked over the pit and taken apart. Luckily Maun has a Toyota dealer who could supply all the necessary parts. Though it took a few week before all the parts had arrived. While waiting for the new axle and accessory parts I found a little leak from the stearing rack and got at it.

After 4 weeks of fixing we could finally drive the car off the pit, all lubricated and sealed and ready for new adventures. Doing it myself probably took a bit longer, but at least I know what was done and that it was done proper. I also learned quite a bit along the way. Some struggles here and there and challenges arising because of the lack of special tools made it very satisfying finally finishing the job. And it sure helped having an experienced “fix it yourself” dad by your side.